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History and Heritage

Remembering a Lost Hero

Black Medal of Honor recipient rediscovered after some 130 years

December 26, 1872, the day after Christmas - the weather in Norfolk was bitter cold, with sleet and a gale-force wind. Aboard USS Powhatan, a sidewheel steamer commissioned in 1852, it was particularly unpleasant, with a wet, slippery deck, and a dangerous pitch.


Then came a cry of "Man overboard!" Boatswain Jack Walton had fallen from the fo'c'sle into the choppy, freezing water below. He had minutes, maybe seconds, before he either drowned or succumbed to hypothermia.

Seaman Joseph Noil didn't hesitate, didn't stop to think of the danger or the risk to his own life. He came running from below deck, "took the end of a rope, went overboard, under the bow, and caught Mr. Walton - and held him until he was hauled into the boat sent to his rescue," his commanding officer, Capt. Peirce Crosby, wrote. "Mr. Walton, when brought on board, was almost insensible, and would have perished but for the noble conduct of Noil."

Noil received the Medal of Honor the following month.

Then, he slowly faded from history.

Coming to America

Noil was black and was probably from Liverpool, Nova Scotia, although various records also mention Halifax, the West Indies, New York and Pennsylvania, said Bart Armstrong, a Canadian researcher dedicated to finding some 113 Medal of Honor recipients connected to that country.

"During the early days, it was not uncommon for a Soldier or Sailor to fake their residence or place of birth, date of birth or marital status."

No one knows just what brought Noil to the U.S., or what inspired him to enlist in the Union Navy, Oct. 7, 1864. According to Armstrong, many Canadian black men who traveled south to fight in the Civil War did so to help free the slaves.

Canada was the terminus for the Underground Railroad, and many citizens, particularly in the black community, would have seen or heard of the pitiful, dehumanizing conditions escaped slaves endured.

Noil was from a coastal area, and the Navy may have been a natural fit. Enlistment papers indicate his occupation was carpenter. Dr. Regina Akers, a historian who specializes in diversity at the Navy's History and Heritage Command, noted that he also served as a caulker and would have helped keep his ship watertight - "a very important job."

Black Sailors

Many free black Sailors had some type of ship or shipyard experience, whether it was as a crewmember on a merchant or whaling ship, as a fisherman or as a dockyard worker, Joseph P. Reidy, a history professor at Howard University in D.C. and the director of the African-American Sailors Project, wrote in "Prologue," a publication of the National Archives.

According to Akers and Reidy, African-American Sailors had always been, if not precisely welcome in the Navy, at least not institutionally discriminated against. They had served honorably in the Revolution and in the War of 1812, and some 18,000 black Civil War Navy veterans have been identified by name.

Unlike the Army, the Navy in the 19th century did not segregate black servicemen. They pulled the same watches, slept in the same bunks - hammocks in those days - and ate in the same galleys as their white counterparts.

Although their ranks were limited to enlisted, there were few, if any, rating restrictions for skilled, experienced men of any color, said Akers. They served in almost every billet, from fireman to gunner, although Reidy wrote that service ratings such as cook or steward were the most common.

"If they could qualify or were able to learn that skill set and fill that rating, just like today, many commanding officers would allow them to do so," Akers said, noting that the background of the ship's commander and crew could affect the treatment African-American Sailors received.

Noil eventually became captain of the hold, a petty officer in charge of the men assigned to a storage area. He would probably have been responsible for ensuring barrels and containers were properly stowed and locating the appropriate barrels when needed, according to the Navy History and Heritage Command. However, he wouldn't have had any authority over white Sailors.

Conditions were worse for escaped slaves, Reidy pointed out. By classifying escaped or captured slaves as contraband, the Union could legally consider them spoils of war and put them to work. Contrabands served in the Navy. They fought in the Army. They built fortifications. They cooked. They did laundry. Both men and women served in various capacities. In fact, nearly three men born into slavery served for every black man born free.

Contrabands' naval ratings and pay tended to be the lowest and least skilled, with most classified as boy or landsman, Reidy explained. They scrubbed, painted and polished ships. They also served in large numbers on supply and ordnance ships, where they provided manual labor. By the late 1900s, the ratings available to all African-American Sailors became extremely restricted.

Noil's Service

Noil, who had given his age as 25 when he enlisted in 1864 and his height at 5 feet, 6 inches, transferred to USS Nyack, a wooden-hulled screw gunboat, in January 1865. Nyack was then part of the blockade off of Wilmington, North Carolina, and Noil was likely present for her involvement in the capture of nearby Fort Anderson the following month.

His next posting is listed as the steam sloop USS Dacotah in March 1866, although Navy records indicate the ship put out to sea that January on a tour that took her to Funchal, Maderia, Portugal; Rio de Janerio, Brazil; Montevideo, Uruguay, the Strait of Magellan and Valparaiso, Chili.

Noil was discharged, March 18, 1867. Perhaps he found it difficult to make a living or perhaps he simply missed the sea, for he re-enlisted, Dec. 18, 1871, giving his age as 30. Presumably, he went straight to Norfolk and USS Powhatan, then part of the North Atlantic Squadron and one of the Navy's last, and largest, paddle frigates.

The ship's conduct book noted Noil was "always 1st class and on time." Upon receiving the Medal of Honor, Noil followed in the footsteps of eight African-American Sailors who received the medal during the Civil War. Akers noted that no African-American Sailor has received the Medal of Honor since the Spanish-American War.

Shipmates

For Noil and the others, their actions showed that valor transcended color, that black, brown, white, it didn't matter - shipmates came first.

Shipmate comes without definition. It's not because - you're white, because you're black, because we come from the same state, because you're in the same rating. - It doesn't stop when the orders stop. - Your shipmates are your shipmates. I mean, that's your family."
- Dr. Regina Akers


Noil's story, Akers continued, also "reminds us of - the importance of Sailors' readiness, their physical and mental fitness, the training. Drill, drill, drill. Drill them down to the point where they can think almost unconsciously about what to do. So, man overboard. - There's just certain procedures that pop into place. Now, the environment makes it that much worse. But it doesn't change the routine or the requirements or the plan for what to do if someone falls overboard."

Over the next few years, Noil was discharged and re-enlisted twice. His next ship was USS Wyoming, a wooden-hulled, 198-foot screw sloop of war. The Wyoming arrived in Villefranche, France, near Nice, Christmas Eve 1878, and spent the next two years in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

Hospitalized

She returned to Hampton Roads, Virginia, May 21, 1881. It was her final cruise. It was Noil's as well. It must have been a difficult one, for that month, he was admitted to the naval hospital in Norfolk and quickly transferred to the Government Hospital for the Insane in Washington, D.C.

"For many months," his admission paperwork reads, "it has been noticed that the patient's mind was failing, that he was losing his locomotive powers. ... Early in April last, he had an epileptic attack, and another on the 13th of May. For two days after latter attack he was speechless, though able to walk and eat. As he has been in the U.S. Naval service for the last seventeen years, it is natural to infer the disease originated in the line of duty."

No one knows exactly what condition Noil suffered from, whether it was what is now known as post-traumatic stress disorder, some form of depression or something else, said Jogues Prandoni, Ph.D., a volunteer historian and former director of forensic services at the hospital, now called St. Elizabeth's.

There could be so many reasons. Back in that era, so little was known about mental illness that sometimes certain disorders that were clearly neurological and brain-based were attributed to other causes." - Jogues Prandoni, Ph.D.


There also wasn't much 19th-century medicine could do for Noil, Prandoni continued, noting that although the hospital was the premier treatment facility for servicemen and veterans - as well as local civilians - only six medical doctors were on staff to treat roughly a thousand patients.

"What you had, basically, was moral therapy," he explained. "The concept was that if you could remove people from the stresses of day-to-day living, put them in a homelike atmosphere with beautiful surroundings and caring individuals that would assist them in recovering."

Noil's wife, Sarah Jane, was terribly worried about her husband. With two daughters to support, she couldn't afford to visit him, but she wrote to his doctor regularly: "I was sorry to hear that my husband was so sick and out of his mind. - Doctor do you think that I had better come on and see him? I am very poor with two children to look after," she wrote in July 1881, later telling the doctor that her "poor little children is always talking about their papa and it makes me feel bad to hear them.

"Doctor I am glad to think he has had good care. ... Doctor if my husband should die I tell you I have not got the means to bury him," she added that November.

Lost then Found Again

Her husband did pass away, March 21, 1882. "He was a relatively young man," said Prandoni. "He died within nine months. That really raises questions about what kind of disease process was going on. It certainly sounds like more than just a psychiatric disorder."

"The loss of my poor husband has been quite a shock to me. - My friends assure me that time will reconcile me to my great bereavement," Sarah Jane wrote after learning of his death. "Yet time and the great consolation that I have in meeting in a better world where parting will be no more, will I trust enable me to bear my sorrow."

Unfortunately, Noil's name was misspelled on his death certificate and subsequently his headstone. For more than a century, he lay lost in Saint Elizabeth's graveyard under the name Joseph Benjamin Noel until a group of historians and researchers connected with the Congressional Medal of Honor Society and the Medal of Honor Historical Society, including Armstrong, finally tracked him down.

Noil finally received a new headstone last spring, one with not only the correct spelling of his name, but also recognizing him as a Medal of Honor recipient.

Your shipmate is not simply someone who happens to serve with you. He or she is someone who you know that you can trust and count on to stand by you in good times and bad and who will forever have your back. - We are [Noil's] shipmates and 134 years after he passed, we have his back." - Vice Adm. Robin Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve