Navy Flag Officer Biography

Vice Admiral William D. Sullivan

United States Navy
United States Representative
North Atlantic Treaty Organization Military Committee

Vice Admiral William D. Sullivan

Vice Admiral William D. Sullivan is the U.S. Military Representative (US MILREP) to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Military Committee, NATO Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium. He represents the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) in deliberations and actions on the Military Committee, the highest military authority of NATO. He also works closely with military representatives of NATO and Partnership for Peace member nations to develop policy recommendations for the political authorities of the Alliance.

Prior to assuming his current duties as the US MILREP, Vice Adm. Sullivan served as the Vice Director for Strategic Plans and Policy on the Joint Staff, responsible for the formulation of joint strategic plans, documents, and studies on current and future military strategy and for international negotiations.

A 1972 graduate of Florida State University, Vice Adm. Sullivan received his commission following completion of Officer Candidate School in Newport, R.I.

Vice Adm. Sullivan has served at sea in a variety of surface combatants and Battle Group staff assignments. He commanded the guided missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 10) during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm and the Aegis guided missile cruiser USS Cowpens (CG 63) during combat operations in the Persian Gulf.

Ashore, Vice Adm. Sullivan has served in a variety of staff assignments including a previous tour on the Joint Staff in the Directorate for Operations. As a Flag Officer, he commanded U.S. Naval Forces, Korea, from September 1999 to September 2001. He was then assigned to the U.S. Pacific Command as Director for Strategy and Plans from September 2001 to June 2003.

Vice Adm. Sullivan earned a masters degree in national security studies from Georgetown University in 1990 and a masters degree in national security strategy from the National War College in 1994.

Updated: 11 October 2007