Graphic used for page header

Full screen images are hyperlinked from the thumbnails on the left.

Picture, caption follows At sea with USS Salt Lake City, May 23, 2002 The fast attack submarine USS Salt Lake City (SSN 716) transits the mouth of Apra Harbor for a short port visit in Guam. Salt Lake City's stealth design, endurance, and mobility provide the National Command Authority a powerful tool for protecting U.S. interests and supporting allies around the world. The modern submarine is the original stealth weapon. Salt Lake City is a Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine homeported in San Diego, Calif. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Alan D. Monyelle. [020523-N-9885M-001] May 23, 2002
Picture, caption follows The Pacific Oean, May 22, 2002 A line stretches from the bow of the diesel-powered auxiliary research submarine USS Dolphin (AFSS 555) as it is towed by a tug to port following a fire and flooding approximately 100 miles off the coast of San Diego late Tuesday evening. All 43 crew members were evacuated safely with only a few minor injuries. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Michael D. Kennedy. [020522-N-5067K-004] May 22, 2002 See the Navy News Stand story on this incident.
Picture, caption follows San Diego, Calif., May 22, 2002 Capt. Bruce Smith, Commander, Submarine Squadron Eleven, (left) answers questions about an accident involving the research and development submarine USS Dolphin (AGSS 555) during a press conference held at Naval Submarine Base, Point Loma. With Capt. Smith are Capt. Gerald F. Nies, Submarine Installations Manager, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, and Coast Guard Lt. Pete Melnick, 11th Coast Guard District. USS Dolphin suffered a fire and flooding while operating approximately 100 miles off the coast of San Diego. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Frederick McCahan. [020522-N-8894M-001] May 22, 2002 See the Navy News Stand story on this incident.
Picture, caption follows Apra Harbor, Guam, May 21, 2002 The fast attack submarine USS Tucson (SSN 770) transits past the mouth of Apra Harbor, Guam. Tucson, commissioned Sept. 9, 1995, has retractable bow planes to give the ship increased maneuverability. Tucson's stealth design, endurance, and mobility provide the National Command Authority a powerful tool for protecting U.S. interests and supporting allies around the world. The modern submarine is the original stealth weapon. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Alan D. Monyelle. [020521-N-9885M-002] May 21, 2002
Picture, caption follows Groton, Conn., May 8, 2002 Nautilus (SSN 571), the world's first nuclear powered submarine, leaves the Electric Boat Shipyard in Groton enroute Naval Submarine Base New London. Nautilus underwent a five-month preservation at a cost of approximately $4.7 million. On Jan. 17,1955, USS Nautilus put to sea for the first time and signaled her historic message "Underway on nuclear power." She steamed submerged 1,300 miles from New London to San Juan, Puerto Rico, in just 84 hours. The success of Nautilus ensured the future of nuclear power in the Navy. Now a museum, Nautilus is expected to re-open to the public at Groton's Submarine Force Library and Museum by Armed Forces Day. The historic ship attracts some 250,000 visitors annually. U.S. Navy photo by Nicole Hawley. [020508-N-8363H-003] May 8, 2002
Picture, caption follows Groton, Conn., May 1, 2002 Crewmen prepare to cast off all lines as the Navy's newest fast attack nuclear submarine, USS Connecticut (SSN 22), departs her homeport of Submarine Base New London, Conn., on her first scheduled deployment. Connecticut, commissioned Dec. 11, 1998, the second of the Seawolf-class of attack submarines, is designed to be exceptionally quiet, fast, and well-armed with advanced sensors. It is a multi-mission ship, capable of deploying to forward ocean areas to search out and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships, and to fire missiles in support of other forces. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist Seaman Apprentice Woody Paschall. [020501-N-4281P-001] May 1, 2002. For more information, see Connecticut's commissioning story.
Picture, caption follows Sasebo, Japan, Apr. 25, 2002 - The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS La Jolla (SSN 701), with the deep submergence rescue vehicle Mystic (DSRV-1) attached, gets underway to participate in the submarine rescue Exercise Pacific Reach 2002. La Jolla and Mystic will operate with surface ships and submarines from the U.S., Japan, Australia, the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Singapore during Exercise Pacific Reach. Mystic was specifically designed to fill the need for an improved means of rescuing the crew of a submarine immobilized on the ocean floor. It can operate independently of surface conditions or under ice for rapid response to an accident anywhere in the world. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 3rd Class Wes Eplen. [020425-N-0401E-002] Apr. 25, 2002

Button link to following named pageMore Navy submarine images Button linking to following listed page U.S. Navy Photo Gallery