This Day in Naval History - Aug. 23

Story Number: NNS020718-37Release Date: 7/18/2002 4:49:00 PM
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From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division

1819 - Commodore Oliver H. Perry, the hero of the Battle of Lake Erie, dies on board the schooner, USS Nonsuch, in Trinidad of a fever contracted during his successful efforts to suppress piracy while maintaining the friendship of Latin American governments. It was his 34th birthday.

1862 - A boat crew from USS Essex, commanded by Capt. William D. Porter, is fired on by Confederate guerillas at Bayou Sara, La. In return, USS Essex shells the town.

1864 - During the Civil War, Rear Adm. David G. Farraguts squadron capture Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay, Ala., winning control of Mobile Bay. The fort withstands naval bombardment for more than two weeks.

1890 - USS Baltimore (Cruiser #3) departs New York Harbor to return the remains of inventor John Ericsson to his native Sweden. For the US Navy, Ericssons most notable designs are for USS Princeton and USS Monitor. In honor of Ericsson, three U.S. Navy ships have been named in his honor: the torpedo boat Ericsson (Torpedo Boat # 2), 1897-1912; and the destroyers Ericsson (DD 56), 1915-1934; and Ericsson (DD 440), 1941-1970.

1942 - During Operation Europe, USS Tuscaloosa (CA 37), escorted by destroyers Rodman (DD 456) and Emmons (DD 457) and British destroyer HMS Onslaught, arrives at Murmansk, Russia, and disembark men and unloads equipment from two RAF Bomber Command squadrons that were transferred to North Russia.

1963 - The first satellite communications ship, USNS Kingsport (T AG 164) connects President John F. Kennedy with Nigerian Prime Minister Balewa who is on board for the first satellite (Syncom II) relayed telephone conversation between heads of state, in Lagos, Nigeria.

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