Typhoon Operates in Waters Off Horn of Africa


Story Number: NNS060501-10Release Date: 5/1/2006 10:15:00 PM
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By Journalist 3rd Class Bobby Northnagle, Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet Public Affairs

MANAMA , Bahrain (NNS) -- USS Typhoon (PC 5) completed a monthlong operation with Combined Task Force (CTF) 150 April 27, during which the patrol craft conducted maritime security operations (MSO) alongside the Royal Netherlands Navy support ship HNLMS Amsterdam (A 836) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Wrangell (WPB 1332).

The underway period marked only the second time a Navy patrol craft has operated in the waters surrounding the Horn of Africa and the first such time for Patrol Craft (PC) Crew Delta.

CTF 150, commanded by Pakistan navy Rear Adm. Shahid Iqbal, is responsible for conducting MSO in the Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Aden, the Red Sea and the North Arabian Sea.

Typhoon's role in the mission, like Wrangell, was to use its size and speed to do what larger Navy vessels could not.

"[Typhoon's] job was to get as close to dhows and merchant vessels as possible and to send a boarding crew to gather intelligence about maritime activity in the area," said Lt. T.J. Mayott, Typhoon's weapons officer.

"The mission was also to show our presence to local mariners and let them know coalition forces are here to prevent piracy and terrorism," said Lt. Cmdr. P.C. Thien, Typhoon's commanding officer.

Delta Crew members aboard Typhoon operated the ship while members of Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment 401 performed necessary boardings.

"This mission revealed how versatile a PC crew is," said Mayott. "Every Sailor is expected to do the jobs of multiple rates. At any moment, a gunner's mate can be a culinary specialist, help fix an engine or perform the duties of quartermaster of the watch. A PC Sailor is a well-rounded Sailor."

"[Responsibilities] are pushed farther down the chain-of-command than normally expected," agreed Thien. "Some seamen aboard the Typhoon have more on their shoulders than some first class petty officers on a larger ship."

MSO set the conditions for security and stability in the maritime environment as well as complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of regional nations. These operations deny international terrorists use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material.

For related news, visit the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet Navy NewsStand page at www.news.navy.mil/local/cusnc/.

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Dutch Marines aboard the HNLMS Amsterdam (A-836) conduct a routine boarding of a merchant vessel in the Arabian Sea.
060409-N-0448N-096 Arabian Sea (April 9, 2006) - Dutch Marines aboard the HNLMS Amsterdam (A-836) conduct a routine boarding of a merchant vessel in the Arabian Sea. The Amsterdam, along with USS Typhoon (PC 5) and U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Wrangell (WPB 1332) are currently underway conducting maritime security operations (MSO). MSO help set the conditions for security and stability in the maritime environment as well as complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of regional nations. These operations deny international terrorists use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 3rd Class Bobby Northnagle (RELEASED)
April 14, 2006
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