Truman Sailors Practice Tool Control


Story Number: NNS070204-07Release Date: 2/4/2007 3:58:00 PM
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By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) (HST) Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) introduced their Tool Control Program (TCP) to all shipboard work centers in February and expects to complete the task by March of 2007.

AIMD has covered 55 work centers and five departments so far.

TCP was initiated by Capt. James Gigliotti, former HST commanding officer. Gigliotti established the program to improve ordering, storage, upkeep and accountability of tools throughout the command. Ensign Shariva Cordero, the AIMD quality assurance officer, continues implementing TCP throughout the command. The program also assists in the reduction of foreign object damage (FOD), which the current commanding officer, Capt. Herman Shelanski, continues to emphasize.

"TCP reduces FOD by having accountability for all tools," said the TCP Assistant Coordinator, Aviation Electrician's Mate (AW) 1st Class Michael Mihalic. "If a tool is discovered missing, the first step is to stop all work and search for the missing or broken tool, which in return reduces FOD. It's important because a tool can be sucked into an aircraft engine and cause serious damage or even death."

"We [Aviation], sleep, drink, and breathe tool control," said Cordero. Their goal is to take what is so familiar to them, and familiarize the rest of the ship. Tool control is a safety, cost and an accountability issue.

Cordero said if every division has TCP in place, it won't be hard to find out who was working in that area, with that tool, at that time.

Mihalic went to the departments, and he showed them how to organize, label, order, and store their tools.

"Most of the work was done by the divisions," said Mihalic. "I just came in and set it in place. I went to the departments and showed them how they can order a single tool without ordering a whole set."

Ordering one tool four times a quarter instead of a set saves an estimated $2,608.

In addition to saving money, TCP includes a log book to sign tools in and out.

"A lot of the departments realized how much easier it was for them to find the tools they need. When you know where something is, you go straight to it, and get the job done," said Mihalic.

Truman's TCP has been getting noticed outside the lifelines of the ship as well.

"I know it's getting a lot of attention," said Mihalic, adding that the program has saved Truman an estimated $3,607.44 as of the present. The program is so effective, there has been talk of taking it Navy-wide.

"Taking this program Navy-wide is going to say Truman is a trendsetter. It will perpetuate our ongoing success as the best carrier in the fleet," he said.

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75/.

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RELATED PHOTOS
Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jessica Liles, assigned to USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), gathers tools to perform maintenance on a set of E-2C Hawkeye brakes.
070131-N-3143M-201 Atlantic Ocean (Jan. 31, 2007) - Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jessica Liles, assigned to USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), gathers tools to perform maintenance on a set of E-2C Hawkeye brakes. Truman is currently underway conducting flight deck certification in the Atlantic Ocean. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Damian Martinez (RELEASED)
February 2, 2007
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