Groundbreaking "Green" Roof Project Begins at NS Norfolk


Story Number: NNS100609-13Release Date: 6/9/2010 4:56:00 PM
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From Naval Station Norfolk Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Continuing to execute energy conservation initiatives, Naval Station Norfolk will kick-off one of the Navy's first "green" roof project June 10 at 10 a.m.

A "green" roof is a concept where a building's roof is partially or completely covered with vegetation that is planted over the roof's waterproofing membrane.

Green roofs benefit the environment by filtering and retaining pollutants held in rainwater runoff thus improving the water quality that enters into sanitized sewer systems. Additionally, runoff is reduced resulting in reduced storm drainage system loads, while also reducing the phenomena of heat island effect, as well as filtering air pollutants that are deposited from the atmosphere and storing the carbon dioxide, which mitigates smog formation. The result is the formation of a living environment that provides habitats for birds and other small animals, insulating the building thus reducing heating and cooling needs and offering an attractive alternative to traditional roofs.

Economically the benefits include energy cost savings, a longer service-lifespan than conventional roofs, surface protection against UV rays and hail, decreased costs associated with installation of storm water detention and treatment systems, and lower storm water utility fees assessed by local utility and enhances resale value of property.

The $613K project will be completed in December.

For more news from Naval Station Norfolk, visit www.navy.mil/local/nsn.

STORY COMMENTS2 COMMENTS
6/10/2010 5:23:00 PM
How long will it take to recover the cost, over 600 thousand, to realize a savings with this project. Also will gas or electric be used to trim the growth?

6/10/2010 10:05:00 AM
It will be very interesting to see comparative "ground up" costs at the end of a full 12 month cycle. Personally, I think you're being "lead into the grass" by someone who has likely very little personal experience in actual hands on applications in this environment. Best of luck ;-)

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