U.S. Naval Forces Open Odyssey Dawn, Prepare No-Fly Zone


Story Number: NNS110319-16Release Date: 3/19/2011 6:27:00 PM
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By Defense Media Activity - Navy

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- U.S. naval forces participated in a Tomahawks missile strike March 19 on Libya as part of Operation Odyssey Dawn designed to set the conditions for a coalition no-fly zone.

Arleigh Burke-class, guided-missile destroyers USS Stout (DDG 55) and USS Barry (DDG 52) and submarines USS Providence (SSN 719), USS Scranton (SSN 756) and USS Florida (SSGN 728) participated in the strike.

More than 110 Tomahawk cruise missiles were used in the strike by U.S. and British ships and submarines against Libyan air defense, surface-to-air missile sites and communication nodes.

The U.S. Joint Task Force (JTF) is commanded by Adm. Samuel J. Locklear, III, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, and is operating from the USS Mount Whitney (LCC/JCC 20), currently deployed in the Mediterranean Sea.

In addition to the task force command ship, and the five ships and subs that took part in the strikes, the JTF includes USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), and USS Ponce (LPD 15).


Video of tomahawk launch from USS Barry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JlZpg2SvSs



For more news, visit www.navy.mil.

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RELATED PHOTOS
USS Barry (DDG 52) launches a Tomahawk missile in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn.
110319-N-7231E-001 MEDITERRANEAN SEA (March 19, 2011) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52) launches a Tomahawk missile in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn. This was one of approximately 110 cruise missiles fired from U.S. and British ships and submarines that targeted about 20 radar and anti-aircraft sites along Libya's Mediterranean coast. Joint Task Force Odyssey Dawn is the U.S. Africa Command task force established to provide operational and tactical command and control of U.S. military forces supporting the international response to the unrest in Libya and enforcement of United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1973. (U.S. Navy photo by Interior Communications Electrician Fireman Roderick Eubanks/Released)
March 19, 2011
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