Navy Announces Research Vessel to be Named in Honor of Neil Armstrong


Story Number: NNS120924-04Release Date: 9/24/2012 12:57:00 PM
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From Department of Defense

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that the first Armstrong-class Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) ship will be named Neil Armstrong.

Mabus named the future R/V Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) to honor the memory of Neil Armstrong, best known for being the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong was an aeronautics pioneer and explorer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) serving as an engineer, test pilot, astronaut and administrator. Armstrong also served as a naval aviator flying nearly 80 combat missions during the Korean War.

"Neil Armstrong rightly belongs to the ages as the man who first walked on the moon. While he was a true pioneer of space exploration and science, he was also a combat-proven naval aviator," said Mabus. "Naming this class of ships and this vessel after Neil Armstrong honors the memory of an extraordinary individual, but more importantly, it reminds us all to embrace the challenges of exploration and to never stop discovering."

Armstrong's widow, Carol, will serve as the ship's sponsor.

The Armstrong-class AGOR ship will be a modern oceanographic research platform equipped with acoustic equipment capable of mapping the deepest parts of the oceans, and modular on-board laboratories that will provide the flexibility to meet a wide variety of oceanographic research challenges. These make them capable of supporting a wide range of oceanographic research activities conducted by academic institutions and national laboratories. Additionally, the research vessel will be outfitted with multi-drive, low-voltage diesel electric propulsion systems. This upgraded system will maintain engine efficiency while lowering maintenance and fuel costs.

Armstrong-class AGOR ships will be 238 feet in length, have a beam length of 50 feet, and operate at more than 12 knots. AGOR 27 is currently under construction by Dakota Creek Industries, Inc. in Anacortes, Wash.

For more news from secretary of the Navy public affairs, visit www.navy.mil/SECNAV.

STORY COMMENTS5 COMMENTS
10/7/2012 12:17:00 PM
What a great honor for Neil and Carol Armstrong.

9/26/2012 9:39:00 PM
Of course - it might have been NICE if we'd had a SPACECRAFT to name after him. But since we don't have a freaking manned space program any more, an ocean going vessel have to do.

9/26/2012 12:59:00 PM
Nice to see a ship named after what I consider to an actual hero. Perhaps one named after Christopher Stevens wouldn't be out of sorts. And other astronauts.

9/26/2012 8:17:00 AM
Vale Neil Armstrong. From the far side of this planet we remember your extraordinary achievement for your partner (Buzz) and for all humanity. May your name live on forevermore in the sake of research and discovery for the betterment of all humanity.

9/26/2012 8:04:00 AM
Hooray!!!!! So much better than naming a ship after another politician.

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RELATED PHOTOS
Dr. Susan K. Avery, president and director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, welds the keel at an authentication of the Keel Ocean-class Research Vessel AGOR 27 and dedication of the Keel Ocean-class Research Vessel AGOR 28.
Official U.S. Navy file photo of Dr. Susan K. Avery, president and director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, welding the keel at an authentication of the Research Vessel Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) and dedication of the Neil Armstrong-class Research Vessel AGOR 28 on Aug. 17, 2012. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Sept. 24 that this class of AGOR would bear the name of the first man to set foot on the moon, and Navy Veteran Neil Armstrong. AGOR ships are modern oceanographic research platforms capable of satisfying a wide range of research activities in oceanographic research. The ships will join the U.S. Academic research fleet, supporting critical naval research throughout the world's oceans. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)
August 20, 2012
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