Navy Announces Navy Working Uniform Type I Update


Story Number: NNS130401-22Release Date: 4/1/2013 8:48:00 PM
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From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- NAVADMIN 084/13 released April 1 provides a summary on all Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I related guidance and announces the authorized wear of the aiguillette and the expanded wear of the 9-inch rough side out and 8-inch flight deck steel toed safety boots with the NWU Type I.

"We believe we owed our Sailors the best opportunity to be successful with regards to the uniform wear of the NWU and felt like if we captured all the information into a single NAVADMIN, that would be the right thing to do," said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens. "Providing this clarity and education is very important to me."

Since the roll-out of the NWU Type I in December 2008, Fleet input has resulted in the revised policy and rules of wear. NAVADMIN 084/13 discusses in detail the description, uniform components, standards of appearance, occasions for wear, and proper care instructions.

The NAVADMIN, at commanding officer's discretion, expands the authorized footwear to be worn with NWU Type I to include a black 9-inch leather (smooth) steel-toed boot, a black 9-inch rough side out leather steel toed boot and a black 8-inch aviation flight deck steel toed boot.

Also at the commanding officer's discretion, aiguillettes can be worn with the NWU Type I shirt and parka by personnel assigned to billets in which aiguillettes are a prescribed uniform item. Personnel should be aware that puncturing the outer shell of the parka will compromise the manufacturer's water proof guarantee and void the lifetime warranty. Parkas that are punctured or torn will have to be repaired or replaced at the owner's expense.

In addition to NAVADMIN 084/13, the Navy released a training video that demonstrates how to properly wear NWU Type I components. The video can be found at http://www.navy.mil/video_player.asp?id=18243.

For more information on uniforms and uniform policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters website at http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/uniforms/pages/default2.aspx.

For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnp/.



For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnp/.

STORY COMMENTS4 COMMENTS
4/16/2013 10:29:00 AM
Can someone explain to me why sailors need to wear camouflage utilities. What was wrong with dungarees? I remember the uniform changes in the early 70's that were really stupid.

4/2/2013 7:24:00 PM
Yay, new boots! ...Who cares?! This uniform is absurd, in looks, functionality, durability, and performance. It is STILL not "fire-proof" like it was said to be when it first rolled out. I am very proud of my Naval service, but ashamed of wearing this uniform. This is the worst pallet of colors to use to make a 'military' uniform, especially for the Navy... with the big boats that go out to sea, which is BLUE! If one were to fall overboard, good luck seeing them, they blend in now!

4/2/2013 5:50:00 PM
I believe it was during 1971 the Navy began to consider a change to the work uniform, with a pull over jumper, straight legged pants, and a new styled ball cap. The current change reflects practical changes for the working uniform based on the Navy's ever-evolving mission. Continued success to the Navy!

4/2/2013 7:21:00 AM
What was wrong with the dungaree uniform? Why go to the added expense just to try to look like special forces personnel?

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