Riverwalk Access to DC Navy Museums Remains Open Through Holiday Weekend


Story Number: NNS130828-03Release Date: 8/28/2013 10:54:00 AM
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From Naval History and Heritage Command Communication Outreach Division

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The National Museum of the United States Navy, Cold War Gallery and Display Ship Barry as well as the entrance to the Washington Navy Yard through the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail will remain open through the Labor Day holiday to ease the flow of holiday foot traffic, said Naval History and Heritage Command officials, Aug. 27.

The month-long initiative, that allows visitors to enter the Washington Navy Yard through the Riverwalk and temporarily extends the hours of Display Ship Barry, permitting sightseers to easily view the Navy's historic exhibits both on and off the yard, started Aug. 1 and will end after Labor Day.

Signs placed along the Riverwalk direct visitors to the Washington Navy Yard entrance located at the Taylor Building, housing the Cold War Gallery. All adult visitors are required to present photo identification to enter. The museums and display ship will be open to visitors 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sunday and Labor Day. After Labor Day, the Riverwalk entrance through the Cold War Gallery will be closed until further notice.

Located at the Washington Navy Yard, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy displays art and artifacts from the Revolutionary War, Antarctic exploration, World War I and World War II, as well as showcasing submarine and deep-sea innovations. Visitors will enjoy peering through a submarine periscope, learning about underwater exploration and diving, and maneuvering WWII-era artifacts. The Cold War Gallery, opened in October, displays a large submarine section, including a view of living and working conditions, artifacts from Vietnam POWs, displays from the Korean War, as well as an interactive exhibit called the "Lion's Den."

Display Ship Barry is one of only three remaining Forrest Sherman class destroyers. Barry is the third ship to bear the name of the illustrious Revolutionary War naval hero, Commodore John Barry. She supported the 1958 Marine and Army airborne unit landing in Beirut, Lebanon. In 1962, she was a member of the task force that quarantined Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis in response to evidence that Soviet missiles had been installed on the island. In 1979, Barry joined the Middle East Force for Persian Gulf service during the very tense period that accompanied the Iranian Revolution. In 1981-1982 Barry made her final deployment in that area. USS Barry was decommissioned in 1982 and arrived at the Washington Navy Yard in 1983.

For more information, visit the National Museum of the United States Navy website at www.history.navy.mil/branches/org8-1.htm.

For more news from Naval History and Heritage Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/navhist/.

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International historians discuss the Trident Intercontinental Ballistic Missile at the Cold War Gallery of the U.S. Navy Museum at the Washington Navy Yard.
Official U.S. Navy file photo of Visitors at the Cold War Gallery discuss the Trident Intercontinental Ballistic Missile on display. The National Museum of the United States Navy, Cold War Gallery and Display Ship Barry as well as the entrance to the Washington Navy Yard through the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail will remain open through the Labor Day holiday to ease the flow of holiday foot traffic.
September 10, 2009
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