GALLERY PHOTOS   (58 Images)

First   Prev   2 of 3   Next   Last
Main Gallery Top Images
This gallery contains content specfic to the platform of your choice.
161027-N-CJ186-0939
PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 27, 2016) NASA's Orion program personnel work with Sailors aboard the amphibious transport dock USS San Diego (LPD 22) to test a new towing technique in the Pacific Ocean. The ship is conducting recovery operations with NASA's Orion program; they are testing a new towing technique utilizing NASA and naval technology with the goal of reducing manning and increasing safety. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)
161027-N-CJ186-0866
PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 27, 2016) U.S. Navy divers assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 and Mobile Dive and Salvage Company 3-1 tow a boilerplate-testing article, belonging to NASA's Orion program, from the amphibious transport dock USS San Diego (LPD 22) into the Pacific Ocean. The ship is conducting recovery operations with NASA's Orion program; they are testing a new towing technique utilizing NASA and naval technology with the goal of reducing manning and increasing safety. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)
161027-N-CJ186-0648
PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 27, 2016) Sailors aboard the amphibious transport dock USS San Diego (LPD 22) work with Navy divers assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 and Mobile Dive and Salvage Company 3-1 to test a new towing technique with NASA's Orion program in the Pacific Ocean. The ship is conducting recovery operations with NASA's Orion Program; they are testing a new towing technique utilizing NASA and naval technology with the goal of reducing manning and increasing safety. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)
161027-N-CJ186-0232
PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 27, 2016) U.S. Navy Chief Warrant Officer 4 Kelvin Dooley, the ship's bos'n aboard the amphibious transport dock USS San Diego (LPD 22), inspects the ship's well deck before starting towing operations with NASA's Orion program. The ship is conducting recovery operations with NASA's Orion program; they are testing a new towing technique utilizing NASA and naval technology with the goal of reducing manning and increasing safety. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Torrey W. Lee/Released)
150902-N-ZZ999-004 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Sept. 2, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) communications satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41. The MUOS 4 satellite will bring advanced, new global communications capabilities to mobile military forces.   (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance/Released)
150902-N-ZZ999-002 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Sept. 2, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) communications satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41. The MUOS 4 satellite will bring advanced, new global communications capabilities to mobile military forces.   (Photo courtesy  United Launch Alliance/Released)
150902-N-ZZ999-003 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Sept. 2, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) communications satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41. The MUOS 4 satellite will bring advanced, new global communications capabilities to mobile military forces.   (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance/Released)
150902-N-ZZ999-001 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Sept. 2, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) communications satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41. The MUOS 4 satellite will bring advanced, new global communications capabilities to mobile military forces.   (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance/Released)
150901-N-ZZ999-001 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Sept. 1, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) communications satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing, on the pad at Space Launch Complex-41. The weather-delayed launch is now scheduled for Sept. 2nd. MUOS is a next-generation narrow band tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyond-line-of-sight communications for U.S. forces on the move. (Photo courtesy of United Launch Alliance/Released)
150831-N-ZZ999-003
CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, Fla. (Aug. 31, 2015) A ULA Atlas V rocket with the Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS-4), is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to the pad at Space Launch Complex-41. (U.S. Navy photo by Ben Cooper/Released)
150831-N-ZZ999-001
CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, Fla. (Aug. 31, 2015) A ULA Atlas V rocket with the Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS-4), is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to the pad at Space Launch Complex-41. (U.S. Navy photo by Ben Cooper/Released)
150831-N-ZZ999-002
CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, Fla. (Aug. 31, 2015) A ULA Atlas V rocket with the Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS-4), is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to the pad at Space Launch Complex-41. (U.S. Navy photo by Ben Cooper/Released)
150819-N-UN340-005 CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Aug. 19, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing, is mated to an Atlas V booster inside the Vertical Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex-41. The launch is scheduled for Aug. 31, 2015. MUOS is a next-generation narrow band tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyond-line-of-sight communications for U.S. forces on the move.  (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance/Released)
150819-N-ZZ999-001 CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.  (Aug. 19, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite, encapsulated in a 5-meter payload fairing, is mated to an Atlas V booster inside the Vertical Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex-41. The launch is scheduled for Aug. 31, 2015. MUOS is a next-generation narrow band tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyond-line-of-sight communications for U.S. forces on the move. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance/Released)
150810-N-ZZ999-001 CAPE CANAVERALl, Fla.  (Aug. 10, 2015) The U.S. Navy's fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS-4) satellite is encapsulated inside a 5-meter payload fairing in preparation for launch on an Atlas V rocket. The launch is scheduled for Aug. 31, 2015. MUOS is a next-generation narrow band tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve beyond-line-of-sight communications for U.S. forces on the move. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance/Released)
150608-N-WF272-123 
KEKAHA, Hawaii (June 8, 2015) Military, NASA, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory members observe NASA's low-density supersonic decelerator (LDSD) test vehicle trajectory after its launch from U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions, and safely returning large payloads to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
150608-N-WF272-102 
KEKAHA, Hawaii (June 8, 2015) NASA members observe NASA's low-density supersonic decelerator (LDSD) test vehicle trajectory after its launch from U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions, and safely returning large payloads to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
150608-N-WF272-093 
KEKAHA, Hawaii (June 8, 2015) The test vehicle for NASA's low-density supersonic decelerator (LDSD) gains altitude after its launch from U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions, and safely returning large payloads to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
150608-N-WF272-067 
KEKAHA, Hawaii (June 8, 2015) The test vehicle for NASA's low-density supersonic decelerator (LDSD) launches from U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions, and safely returning large payloads to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
150608-N-DT805-281 
KAUAI, Hawaii (June 8, 2015) Sailors assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 1 Explosive Ordnance Detachment recover the test vehicle for NASA's low-density supersonic decelerator (LDSD) off the coast of the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions, and safely returning large payloads to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist John M. Hageman/Released)
First   Prev   2 of 3   Next   Last