PHOTO GALLERY
Right control button Left Control button
Photo 040909-N-4779D-002
040909-N-4779D-002 Naval Air Station Key West, Fla. (Sept. 9, 2004) - Naval Air Station Key West Commanding Officer (CO), Capt. Jim Scholl, left, listens as Lt. Bryan Blankenship, Naval Atlantic Meteorology and Oceanography Detachment (NLMOD) Key West officer-in-charge, briefs department heads and officers-in-charge for over 30 Key West tenant commands on the expected arrival of Hurricane Ivan. Lt. Blankenship holds the meetings twice daily during the impending approach of any hurricane. Based on NLMOD's recommendations, Scholl ordered all recreational vehicles and trailers to evacuate Key West. Ivan, an extremely dangerous category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale, has maximum sustained winds near 145 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 50 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles. The well-defined eye of hurricane Ivan was located about 165 miles southeast of Kingston Jamaica. Hurricane Ivan has killed at least 32 people in Grenada, Tobago and Venezuela as it barrels toward Jamaica and possibly the Florida Keys. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 040909-N-9246W-003
040909-N-9246W-003 Naval Air Station Key West, Fla. (Sep. 9, 2004) - Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Alan Schueler, directs traffic around the line of more than twenty motorists waiting in line to fill their gas tanks in preparation for a safe-haven evacuation to Orlando, Fla. Naval Air Station Key West personnel are preparing to evacuate before Hurricane Ivan, currently in the Caribbean Sea, makes landfall. Ivan, an extremely dangerous category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale, has maximum sustained winds near 145 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 50 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles. The well-defined eye of hurricane Ivan was located about 165 miles southeast of Kingston Jamaica. Hurricane Ivan has killed at least 32 people in Grenada, Tobago and Venezuela as it barrels toward Jamaica and possibly the Florida Keys. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Rob Wesselman (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 040909-N-9246W-007
040909-N-9246W-007 Naval Air Station Key West, Fla. (Sep. 9, 2004) - A line of motorists wait for their turn to fuel-up at the Navy Exchange gas station on Sigsbee Park on board Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West, Fla. NAS Key West personnel are making final preparations before an evacuation is ordered prior to the arrival of Hurricane Ivan. Ivan, an extremely dangerous category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale, has maximum sustained winds near 145 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 50 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles. The well-defined eye of hurricane Ivan was located about 165 miles southeast of Kingston Jamaica. Hurricane Ivan has killed at least 32 people in Grenada, Tobago and Venezuela as it barrels toward Jamaica and possibly the Florida Keys. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Rob Wesselman (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 040910-N-4779D-057
040910-N-4779D-057 Key West, Fla. (Sept. 10, 2004) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Eric Sienzant checks on the arrival of an Air National Guard C-130 from N.C., at Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West as patients from local civilian hospitals await evacuation. NAS Key West is providing vital support to the community in preparation for Hurricane Ivan's arrival in the Florida Keys. Ivan, an extremely dangerous category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale, has maximum sustained winds near 145 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 50 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles. The well-defined eye of hurricane Ivan was located about 165 miles southeast of Kingston Jamaica. Hurricane Ivan has killed at least 32 people in Grenada, Tobago and Venezuela as it barrels toward Jamaica and possibly the Florida Keys. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 040910-N-4779D-068
040910-N-4779D-068 Key West, Fla. (Sept. 10, 2004) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class James Appleby directs the arrival of a National Air Guard C-130 from N.C. The plane arrived to pick up patients that needed to be evacuated from local civilian hospitals. Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West is providing vital support to the community in preparation for Hurricane Ivan's arrival in the Florida Keys. Ivan, an extremely dangerous category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale, has maximum sustained winds near 145 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 50 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles. The well-defined eye of hurricane Ivan was located about 165 miles southeast of Kingston Jamaica. Hurricane Ivan has killed at least 32 people in Grenada, Tobago and Venezuela as it barrels toward Jamaica and possibly the Florida Keys. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 041105-N-2718P-002
041105-N-2718P-002 Key West, Fla. (Nov. 5, 2004) - A U.S. Coast Guardsman, assigned to the Law Enforcement Detachment aboard the guided missile frigate USS Curts (FFG 38), off-load 75,000 pounds of cocaine in Key West, Fla. The contraband is the result of five separate seizures including the single largest in history, resulting in the interception of 30,000 pounds of cocaine. The multi-ton shipment, valued at more than $2.3 billion, was seized during drug interdiction operations conducted in the Eastern Pacific between August 31st and September 26th, 2004. U.S. Navy photo by Quartermaster 1st Class John Page (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050201-N-4779D-026
050201-N-4779D-026 Key West, Fla. (Feb. 1, 2005) - Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Henry Vick, a quality assurance technician assigned to Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West, performs a daily flight check on a SH-60B Seahawk helicopter before its maiden flight. The Seahawk helicopter replaced NAS Key West's UH-3H Sea King helicopter and will be used for search and rescue operations. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050107-N-4779D-014
050107-N-4779D-014 Key West, Fla. (Jan. 7, 2005) Pilots, assigned to the Saints of Fighter Squadron Composite Thirteen (VFC-13), perform daily flight checks on their F-5E/F Tiger aircraft on board Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West, Fla. VFC-13 provides quality adversary training for the Navys fleet and replacement squadrons and air wings, reserve fighter and attack squadrons. VFC-13 is scheduled to establish a permanent detachment at NAS Key West in October 2005. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050404-N-4779D-039
050404-N-4779D-039 Key West, Fla. (Apr. 4,2005) - A crane from the Public Works Department on board Naval Air Station Key West, unloads a pallet of cocaine from the flight deck of the guided missile frigate USS Boone (FFG 28). During the offload, Boone and USS Halyburton (FFG 40), rear, transferred more than fifteen tons of cocaine to federal law enforcement agents. The drugs are from seven different smuggling events stopped between Dec. 22, 2004 and Feb. 20, 2005, through a coordinated interagency effort in the Eastern Pacific. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050524-N-8683B-050
050524-N-8683B-050 Key West, Fla. (May 24, 2005) - Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West's UH-3H Sea King helicopter flies near Fort Jefferson in the Dry Tortugas National Park off the southernmost tip of Florida during its last flight. The Sea King will be transferred to NAS Pensacola, Fla., on May 26, 2005, after serving as NAS Key West's search and rescue helicopter for almost a decade. At the controls for the last training flight were Lt. Gainey Maxell and Lt. Tony Martinez. U.S. Navy photo by James Brooks (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050524-N-8683B-126
050524-N-8683B-126 Key West, Fla. (May 24, 2005) - Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West's UH-3H Sea King helicopter flies over the Sand Key lighthouse off the coast of Key West during its last flight. The Sea King will be transferred to NAS Pensacola, Fla., on May 26, 2005, after serving as NAS Key West's search and rescue helicopter for almost a decade. At the controls for the last training flight were Lt. Gainey Maxell and Lt. Tony Martinez. U.S. Navy photo by James Brooks (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050524-N-8683B-054
050524-N-8683B-054 Key West, Fla. (May 24, 2005) - Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Christian Lyons Keeps an eye on the waters surrounding Fort Jefferson in the Dry Tortugas National Park off the southernmost tip of Florida. The crew of Naval Air Station Key West's SH-60F Seahawk helicopter were conducting search and rescue training. U.S. Navy photo by James Brooks (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050131-N-0000B-001
050131-N-0000B-001 Key West, Fla. (Jan. 31, 2005) An F-14B Tomcat, assigned to the Pukin Dogs of Fighter Squadron One Four Three (VF-143), and the squadrons new aircraft, an F/A-18E Super Hornet, fly in formation near Naval Air Station Key West, Fla., during routine training. VF-143 will transition from the F-14B Tomcat to the F/A-18E Super Hornet in Spring 2005, redesignating the squadron as Strike Fighter Squadron One Four Three (VFA-143). U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. John Braun (RELEASED)

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050707-N-4779D-015
050707-N-4779D-015 Key West, Fla. (July 7, 2005) - Naval Atlantic Meteorology and Oceanography Detachment Key West Officer In Charge Lt. Bryan Blankenship indicates the path of Hurricane Dennis during a briefing with the Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West commanding officer, department heads and tenant commands. The commanding officer of NAS Key West ordered the evacuation of all personnel after the briefing. As of 8 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT), Dennis, a Category 4 hurricane, was located 230 miles southeast of Havana, Cuba, and about 285 miles south-southeast of Key West, Florida. The storm is moving northwest at 12 mph, but is expected to start moving west-northwest. It is expected to make landfall late Sunday. The Atlantic hurricane season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED) For more information visit https://weather.navy.mil

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050708-N-4779D-019
050708-N-4779D-019 Key West, Fla. (July 7, 2005) - The family of a Sailor assigned to Naval Air Station Key West, pack their vehicles in preparation for evacuation from the Navy's family housing at Sigsbee Park in Key West for Hurricane Dennis. As of 8 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT), Dennis, a Category 4 hurricane, was located 230 miles southeast of Havana, Cuba, and about 285 miles south-southeast of Key West, Florida. The storm is moving northwest at 12 mph, but is expected to start moving west-northwest. It is expected to make landfall along the Gulf Coast Sunday. The Atlantic hurricane season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED) For more information visit https://weather.navy.mil

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>
Photo 050707-4779D-N-016
050707-4779D-N-016 Key West, Fla. (July 7, 2005) - Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West, Capt. James Scholl, far right, gives the order to evacuate ahead of Hurricane Dennis at a briefing for NAS Key West's fourteen department heads and 34 tenant commands. As of 8 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT), Dennis, a Category 4 hurricane, was located 230 miles southeast of Havana, Cuba, and about 285 miles south-southeast of Key West, Florida. The storm is moving northwest at 12 mph, but is expected to start moving west-northwest. It is expected to make landfall along the Gulf Coast Sunday after passing within 90 miles of Key West on Saturday. The Atlantic hurricane season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Trice Denny (RELEASED) For more information visit https://weather.navy.mil

Download High Resolution
<<  < 2 of 9 >  >>