Home Page
 Careers  Info Index  About Us  Contact Us  Home 
  
>>> Advanced Search
 US Navy Today  About the Navy  Navy Leadership  Media Resources  Links of Interest  Information Index

 Header

Quotes

 
Maritime Strategy
"The world is changing, and that is not necessarily a bad thing, though change can be tough. We have got to deal with it; I believe actually we have got to lead it. " (37th IFPA Fletcher Conference, Ronald Reagan Building, Washington, DC, September 26, 2007)
"Military strategy ... must be envisioned and developed with the idealism embodied in our Constitution, but must be crafted in a realistic tone to ensure military employment remains flexible and adaptable to a rapidly changing world. It is a very precarious balance. " (37th IFPA Fletcher Conference, Ronald Reagan Building, Washington, DC, September 26, 2007)
"How we stay engaged around the world -- which we must do; how we build and maintain partnerships -- which we must do -- will largely determine our ability over the long term to do for the nation all that it expects of us. " (Opening Statement for Senate Committee on Armed Services Confirmation Hearing, Washington, DC, July 31, 2007)
"One of the reasons we have a navy is to win our nation’s wars but a big piece of that is also a deterrent and preventing wars. And I would argue that part of winning wars is never having them and so that will certainly be one of the imperatives we look at as we put the final pieces of our strategy together." (CNO Podcast, Washington DC, 18 June 07)
"Each one of the sailors on Peleliu and Comfort and really in the other humanitarian assistance kinds of missions should know that they’re a key part of our maritime strategy. They’re building relationships. They’re making a difference in people’s lives. They’re doing what navies can do because we are out and about and around the world. And it’s the strength of the fabric of those relationships, which I think will be remembered for many, many years by the young children that they are engaged with who grow up. By the adults in those countries that grow up to become leaders and that they see who the United States is through the sailors that represent the United States of America so well. So they’re really making a difference and it’s a key part of this emerging new maritime strategy of ours." (CNO Podcast, Washington DC, 18 June 07)
"The demands for naval forces are up. The forces that will be needed in the future will be expeditionary, rotational, engaged, whether it’s in Africa, South America, the Gulf, the Western Pacific, or other parts of the world. " (Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Change of Command, 18 May 2007)
"We have put the rudder over, and I believe we have the course about right. Simply reacting to change is no longer an acceptable course of action if our Navy is to successfully wage asymmetric warfare and simultaneously deter regional and transnational threats: Two Challenges, One Fleet." (Before the Senate Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, 28 March 2007)
"Sea Power in this century cannot be harnessed by a single nation acting alone. If we are to build a fleet for the future capable of keeping pace with globalization, we must leverage the capacity of our partners with common interests. The positive potential of Sea Power and freedom of the seas can only be achieved through a collective and cooperative approach focused on international rule of law and freedom of the maritime commons. " (Before the Senate Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, 28 March 2007)
"Sea Power in this century cannot be harnessed by a single nation acting alone. If we are to build a fleet for the future capable of keeping pace with globalization, we must leverage the capacity of our partners with common interests. The positive potential of Sea Power and freedom of the seas can only be achieved through a collective and cooperative approach focused on international rule of law and freedom of the maritime commons." (Before the Senate Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, 28 March 2007)
"We cannot allow ourselves to be fixated on one threat alone. Our national security is dependent upon a strong Navy that can keep the sea lanes free, deter aggression, safeguard our sources of energy, protect the interests of our citizens at home and reassure our friends abroad. We must never relinquish overmatching capability and capacity. " (Before the Senate Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, 28 March 2007)
"If our new Maritime Strategy has any hope of enduring for as long as its predecessors did, it must be of – and for – its time, this new time of uncertainty and change. As we stay patient and committed in Iraq and Afghanistan, as we continue to deploy around the world we must ponder: How do we help win this Long war by all the things Naval Forces are doing right now and how do we prepare for whatever globalization will drive us to next?" (Current Strategy Forum, Naval War College, 14 June 2006)
"Those sovereign flags [of navies] send a very strong message. These are very strong, very significant capabilities that heads of nations can use to send signals of strength, stability and commitment without putting forces ashore -- which can be intimidating. They offer reassurance and security and strength. I’ve seen that all over the world." (Interview with Giorgos P. Malouchos, defense reporter for Greek National daily Kathimerini, 16 May 2007)
"So much depends on maritime security. Even countries who have been focused mostly on land forces are starting to ask questions about it. And in the long run it is very much about economics … and, I like to say, parents trying to raise their children to a higher standard of living." (Interview with Giorgos P. Malouchos, defense reporter for Greek National daily Kathimerini, 16 May 2007)
"The Navy takes our environmental stewardship seriously. We live and work on the sea; it's our home and we respect it. But no admiral wants to sign condolence letters to the families of Sailors of a ship sunk by a submarine we couldn't detect, a submarine we couldn't engage, or a submarine we couldn't sink if we had the chance. Too much is at stake as nations build and operate more quiet and more lethal submarines. Realistic training is critical to national security. We will train responsibly, but we will train." (Pacific Fleet Change of Command, 08 May 2007)
"In addition to the high-end capabilities the United States Navy brings - our aircraft carriers, our submarines, our cruisers, destroyers and those capabilities - the mission set is expanding into what I call the green water and the brown water. We're developing capabilities that relate to the challenges that we face here in the 21st century." (Government Executive Magazine Leadership Breakfast, 1 May 2007)
"The idea of a blue-water Navy, or the big sea battles, I don't expect that to happen, although I think we need to be very mindful of the buildup of the Chinese navy, and security in that part of the world. I don't see any kind of positive outcome if we were to get into a fight with China." (Government Executive Magazine Leadership Breakfast, 1 May 2007)
"While we focus on new missions, we must also ensure that nobody else's Navy – anywhere -- can drive us off the sea." (106th Submarine Birthday Ball, Arlington, Va., 22 April 2006)
"The Maritime Environment is dynamic and the burden of security is much too heavy for any one navy, or any one nation, to carry alone. We need all nations with a stake in maritime security to come together to bear the load." (New York City Navy League, New York, NY 14 March 2007)
"Whenever and wherever the opportunity exists, we must develop and sustain relationships that will help improve the capacity of our emerging and enduring partners’ maritime forces, and help them achieve common desired effects." (From CNO’s 2007 Guidance Focuses on Execution, February 2, 2007 )
"The freedom to conduct naval operations in support of joint, allied and coalition operations -- assuring access and projecting persistent combat power -- must be preserved through enduring, warfighting competencies. We are, and will remain a warfighting, seagoing service." (From CNO’s 2007 Guidance Focuses on Execution, February 2, 2007 )
"The Navy and Marine Corps must be key players in that part of the world (Africa) because of the small footprint naval services can leave in a region where a heavier Western footprint becomes less and less likely." (From an article in Military Officer Magazine, October, 2006)
"Where our previous maritime strategy was designed just to defend a single enemy at sea, our new one must be centered upon building partnerships across the world." (From article in Military Officer Magazine, October 2006)
"In some places we defend the interests of the United States best by defending the right of others to live free, by seeing the world through their eyes and by being the best of all possible ambassadors." (Remarks from Speaking with Sailors, All Hands, August 2006)
"As we have seen in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, Naval Aviation brings revolutionary capabilities to the fight and demonstrates – again and again – the enduring relevance and criticality of our big deck carriers and combat power from the air. No one does it better." (Remarks for the EA-18 Growler Rollout, 3 August 2006 )
"Our Navy’s air force – since its inception – has always been second to none. Rapid – flexible – forward deployed – on call – and on demand: Naval Aviation has been a huge difference maker – both in peace and in war. And it is making an equally tremendous difference today." (Remarks for the EA-18 Growler Rollout, 3 August 2006 )
"The old Maritime Strategy focused on sea control, but I have told my country that our new one must recognize that the economic tide of all nations rises -- not when the seas are controlled by one -- but rather when they are made safe and free for all. " (Remarks at the Indonesian Command and Staff College, 19 July 2006)
"I am convinced that without a shared commitment to a free and secure maritime commons we cannot secure a better and more prosperous future for our children." (Remarks at the Indonesian Command and Staff College, 19 July 2006 )
"Perhaps the greatest strength of naval forces is the inherent flexibility they provide policy makers. Like positive influence, flexibility can help bring certainty to an uncertain world." (Current Strategy Forum, Naval War College, 14 June 2006)
"We need to think critically about how naval forces support the Joint, Inter-Agency, and International effort to intercede effectively when societies are torn asunder by the influence of radical ideologies and destructive behavior." (Current Strategy Forum, Naval War College, 14 June 2006)
"Where the old Maritime Strategy focused on sea control, the new one must recognize that the economic tide of all nations rises – not when the seas are controlled by one – but rather when they are made safe and free for all. Today, the globalization of the world economy is truly an engine of hope for our children for all people." (Current Strategy Forum, Naval War College, 14 June 2006)
"Since most governments derive their legitimacy from economic stability, and most of the world’s commerce still travels by sea – some 90 percent – there remains a key role for navies and maritime security. It is not by happenstance that our vision for the Navy includes the need to keep sea lanes open and free. " (Current Strategy Forum, Naval War College, 14 June 2006)
"Today’s uncertainty and today’s threats are of an entirely unique sort caused and perpetuated by new challenges, challenges brought on, quite frankly, by the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the unstoppable, unrelenting pace of globalization. We therefore need a new Maritime Strategy for this era and for war, for our time and the incredible and growing challenges that we face. " (Current Strategy Forum, Naval War College, 14 June 2006)
"While we focus on new missions, we must also ensure that nobody else's Navy – anywhere -- can drive us off the se" (106th Submarine Birthday Ball, Arlington, Va., 22 April 2006)
"If we have learned nothing else since 9-11 it is that our future will be marked by uncertainty, irregular and increasingly unrestricted warfare. " (Military Strategy Forum, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington 18 April 2006)
"Our imports and exports -- power sources, food, clothing, and so many other necessities of life are furnished more and more by world trade -- and ninety-percent of everything we buy and sell from one another flows across the sea. Given that, our economies simply cannot function and grow without a safe and secure maritime frontier. " (Regional Sea Power Symposium, Argentine Naval Staff Headquarters 7 April 2006)
"Piracy has been with us for along time, but this latest nexus of piracy, terrorism, and exploitation of the sea for illegal purposes demands a response that only maritime forces working together, regionally and globally, can provide. I believe that the need for international maritime cooperation is only going to grow. " (Regional Sea Power Symposium, Argentine Naval Staff Headquarters 7 April 2006)
"I believe that all countries must also learn to look north and south – as well as East and West. Otherwise, we will miss too many great opportunities for mutual friendship and cooperation. Today, we are not just seeing growing globalization…we are also seeing growing cooperation within regions" (Regional Sea Power Symposium, Argentine Naval Staff Headquarters 7 April 2006)
"Next to the Marine Corps, I view our relationship with the United States Coast Guard as the single most critical relationship we can possibly have when it comes to securing the maritime domain. We talk a lot about the Navy-Marine Corps Team and we should. We're going to start talking about the Navy-Coast Guard Team and our national fleet. " (To the Surface Navy Association National Symposium, Hyatt Regency, Arlington, Va., 10 Jan. 2006)
"When it comes to sea power, I want to get at the how. I am convinced that if we don't take a look around at how we are being utilized by this nation today, and how we may be utilized in the future, we run the risk of not being ready when we are called upon, or not being called upon even if we think we're ready. " (To the Surface Navy Association National Symposium, Hyatt Regency, Arlington, Va., 10 Jan. 2006)
"Sea Power 21 provides a great architecture, a terrific vision, but I fear we've let it wander into a debate over what we buy and how much we spend. It's become too programmatic. That needs to change. " (To the Surface Navy Association National Symposium, Hyatt Regency, Arlington, Va., 10 Jan. 2006)
"What I seek is balance. We must be able to win the big and the small wars. Two challenges, one Fleet. " (To the Navy Association National Symposium, Hyatt Regency, Arlington, Va., 10 Jan. 2006)
"I am utterly convinced that we need to raise the level of the discussion and debate about sea power in this country, our maritime nation. For too long it's been centered in my view on one of two things: programs and blue water. Building big things and putting them to sea. " (To the Surface Navy Association National Symposium, Hyatt Regency, Arlington, Va., 10 Jan. 2006)
"This is not naval infantry done by the Navy. This is a security force. This allows us a kind of theater security engagement. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"Our naval infantry in this country is standing to my left [Gen. Mike Hagee]. When we initiated this concept in June, there was some confusion about whether the Navy was going to become some kind of offensive force, a la naval infantry. That is not the intent at all. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"I believe footprint will continue to drive our ability to access -- for extended periods of time -- places ashore that will continue to be more and more restricted over time. In which case sea basing becomes that much more important. It’s not only mobile, but it gives you a place where you can do the country’s bidding, if you will. It gives the president the kind of options he needs. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"Sea basing is what we saw -- or what I describe as the city at sea -- that we literally built in Indonesia to help those countries. There is no other institution in the world that could have done that. Sea basing is what we did for Katrina, sea basing was the hundreds of ships off the Turkish coast all the around the northern Arabian Gulf prior to the commencement OEF." (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005 )
"I believe that the Navy and Marine Corps requirements are inseparable in that we need to be a balanced force. We are both committed to tactical aviation integration, and there are challenges inside that, that have evolved since we have signed up for that in 2002, and that’s fine. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"There are great opportunities for the global security environment. Maritime Domain Awareness -- that is where we are really going in respect to operations in green water and brown water as we evolve that over time. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"In being expeditionary we need to be forward, we need to be flexible, we are scalable. We have to give the president options to dial up or down, if you will, and we need to be able to respond quickly. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"We are moving out in the green and brown water areas and because many operations are looking as an extension of what we talked about in the last few years in terms of the littoral, many operations are focused in the shallows. " (Remarks at the NDIA Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Panama City, Fla., 26 Oct. 2005)
"Predictabilities are very bad characteristics, very bad strategies in war. And so we're not going to be as predictable as we used to be. We're not going to be heel to toe. We're going to change some of that. That said, we will create -- I believe -- windows of certainty, windows of predictability where people can plan their lives." (2006 CNO's Guidance Release Media Roundtable, 13 October 2005, Pentagon, Washington, DC. )
"The MPF Future is not the sea base. It should be some day part of it. But what you saw in Indonesia, that's a different sea base. What you see in the [Arabian] Gulf right now is a different sea base. What you saw in Katrina is a different sea base. The hundreds of ships lined up around, from Turkey all the way to the Gulf before OEF. That’s another view of the sea base. And I think this is really an important point to make. The sea base is made up of lots of different capabilities. " (2006 CNO's Guidance Release Media Roundtable, 13 October 2005, Pentagon, Washington, DC. )
"When our careers began, nobody spoke of the threats from transnational networks, environmental attack, human trafficking, and failed states. But for leaders like us, change often means opportunity and new visions for where we are headed. " (17th International Seapower Symposium, 21 Sept. 2005, Newport, R.I. )
"As navies, we have successfully learned how to leverage the advantages of the sea - advantages such as mobility, access, and sovereignty - to win wars and defend borders. We must now leverage these same advantages of our profession to close seams, reduce vulnerabilities, and ensure the security of the domain we, collectively, are responsible for. " (17th International Seapower Symposium, 21 Sept. 2005, Newport, R.I.)
"We need to be able to surge and respond, and I feel we’ve never been better. Secondly, we need to make sure career plans and development of our Sailors is correct for our 21st Century workforce. The third major challenge is to develop our Navy for the future; to see what works for our force architecture and see what the requirements are." (All Hands Call, 13 September 2005 at the Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Conn.)
"Without mastery of the sea -- without Sea Power -- we cannot protect trade, we cannot help those in peril, we cannot provide relief from natural disaster, and we cannot intercede when whole societies are torn asunder by slavery, weapons of mass destruction, drugs, and piracy. Without sea power we cannot hope -- the world cannot hope -- to achieve what President Bush has called 'a balance of power that favors freedom." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"The sea gives me access to where [the enemy] is and just as importantly where he isn't. It gives me dominance in short order. It takes advantage of my ability to be persistent and, perhaps most critically, it allows me to influence events ashore. And we don't need anybody's permission to do it." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"We cannot sit out in the deep blue, waiting for the enemy to come to us. He will not. We must go to him. I want the ability to go close in and stay there. I believe our Navy is missing a great opportunity to influence events by not having a riverine force. We're going to have one." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"You hear a lot these days about virtual presence. Well, for naval forces, virtual presence is actual absence. And we are not going to be absent. If you're not there you can't do much." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"We've taken to calling our ships 'cities at sea' for a long time and for good reason. What if we took the citizens of that city and moved them ashore to help relieve stress on our Joint partners and make life a little better for people in need?" (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"Our vision is and ought to be to extend the peace through an inter-connected community of maritime nations working together. The enemy goes global. So should we." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"Our Navy and Marine Corps team works to extend that message of hope by defending the inherent freedom of the seas, and by extending the peace through aid and comfort to those in need -- a true City at Sea. That City at Sea was a part of international relief efforts in the Indian Ocean last winter after the tsunami. But we shouldn't have to wait for disaster to strike. And we aren't." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"I believe that to be effective in this uncertain environment, our Navy needs tools that are not only instruments of war, but implements of peace -- to become a strong partner for a stable global community." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)
"We have proven the awesome capability of the sea when used for war. But we have yet to realize the full potential of the sea when leveraged for peace, prosperity, increased understanding, transparency and pervasive security. This, to me, is the real meaning, the real potential of sea power. It is the power of the sea to share and unite, to deter and defeat, to protect and to endure." (To Students and Faculty of the Naval War College, 31 August 2005 at the Naval War College Newport, R.I.)

Quotes by
Category

Leadership/Sailors/Families
1,000 Ship Navy
War on Terror
Shipbuilding/New Platforms
Diversity
Heritage
Recruitment/Retention
Navy Budget/Strategic Plan
Miscellaneous