IWTC Corry Station Performing Arts Company: Local Goodwill Ambassadors


Story Number: NNS191106-04Release Date: 11/6/2019 2:47:00 PM
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By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Neo B. Greene III, Center for Information Warfare Training Public Affairs

PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) -- Sailors who represent an all-volunteer group of dedicated professionals are all about putting on a good show onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola Corry Station Pensacola, Florida.

The Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Performing Arts Company (PAC) is comprised of three different types of performers: band, choir and drill. Each of these performance units performs at various venues and events for both civilians and military audiences. These events range from retirement ceremonies up to drill shows for civilian enjoyment.

“We represent IWTC Corry Station. It’s a way for us to be active in the community and shine a positive light on the military,” said Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class William Browning, the acting lead chief petty officer of PAC. “We perform at ceremonies and community outreach events through the arts.”

Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Jose Aguilar, the band director, believes that along with shining a positive light on the command and the military in general, PAC is a good way to give Sailors and other service members a positive outlet when they are going through a tough time.

“PAC is important for our Sailors because it keeps them from participating in harmful activities while also kind of giving them a standard to maintain while they’re here,” said Aguilar. “Being in band, there are standards that they have to meet: visually, in their uniforms; in their grades at “A” school or “C” school; and even in their behavior. It keeps them on their toes and motivated to succeed.”

For students like Information Systems Technician Seaman Preston Dominique, PAC is his form of stress relief.

“Music has always been really important to me and a really big part of my life,” said Dominique. “PAC is one of those good things that helps me relieve stress when I’m struggling and still helps out my career and the base.”

“Being a member of PAC isn’t just about living up to a standard though,” said Browning. To him, being a member of PAC is also about taking pride in yourself and upholding military traditions while displaying them.

“It’s important to let the public see us. They get to see us upholding our traditions and spreading a more positive image of the military,” shared Browning. “It’s important that people know that we’re working hard to perform. Most of PAC is made of students. They aren’t professionals, and they want to do a little more while performing for the community to show our military pride and traditions.”

The students in PAC agree with these thoughts, wanting to be a better part of the representation for Corry Station.

“It’s our duty station, but it’s also more than that,” said Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 3rd

Class Jesse Hayworth, one of PAC’s choir members. “It helps keep up traditions, like the traditions and values of these songs that have been passed on for ages. It’s also a good way to show off what we can do to the rest of Corry Station and the community.”

While the students get a chance to uphold the traditions of the military and highlight their pride, the PAC leadership say they enjoy the chance to be more of a mentor than they usually could.

“PAC is a way that we can get closer to our students and really mentor them,” offered Browning. “We can kind of take them under our wing more than we could in the class. Seeing a student come through and leave PAC with more military bearing and a better view of how to be a good service member, or a greater appreciation for our traditions.”

Another thing that PAC takes pride in is being able to represent IWTC when they perform. “It’s something that both the students and the communities enjoy,” said Aguilar.

“We take pride in what we do. There isn’t a lot of representation for the base, especially on the community outreach aspect,” said Aguilar. “That’s why it’s important that we get ourselves out there. The fact that we can go out and be the ‘face of the base’ is great, people eat it up when we perform.”

The members of PAC are continuously training to perform for the community, both military and civilian. For every performance, Browning says each member is glad to be participating and to play a role in representing IWTC.

“We’re happy and proud to serve,” said Browning. “We want PAC to be able to do bigger and better things, because we perform in many different places. As long as you meet established guidelines, PAC will be more than happy to perform in an event.”

IWTC Corry Station is a part of the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT). With four schoolhouse commands, two detachments, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT is recognized as Naval Education and Training Command’s top learning center for the past three years. Training over 21,000 students every year, CIWT delivers trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community.

 

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IWTC Corry Station Performing Arts Company: Local Goodwill Ambassadors
191025-N-KJ380-0050 PENSACOLA, Fla. (October 25, 2019) Sailors in the Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida, Performing Arts Company (PAC) play instruments for a retirement ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum. These Sailors are just some of the many thousands training and preparing to defend America around the world as information warfare warfighters. IWTC Corry Station is a part of the Center for Information Warfare Training, and with four schoolhouse commands, two detachments, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT is recognized as Naval Education and Training Command's top learning center for the past three years. Training over 20,000 students every year, CIWT delivers trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in
November 5, 2019
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