Navy Medicine, Smithsonian Team Up to Address Wounded Warrior Care


Story Number: NNS110429-01Release Date: 4/29/2011 5:07:00 AM
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By Paul Dillard, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) (NNS) -- Navy Medicine, in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, co-sponsored a conference on Wounded Warrior care at the National History Museum in Washington, D.C., April 28.

"The purpose of the conference is to raise questions about the changing landscape of health care and how Wounded Warriors live," said Dr. Edward Gabriele, special assistant to the Navy Surgeon General for Ethics and Professional Integrity and deputy vice chancellor, Navy Medicine Institute.

The conference offered a series of keynote lectures, panel presentations and discussions designed to heighten awareness of the presence of Wounded Warriors as equal, contributing members of society.

More than 450 people attended the conference, representing all of the uniformed services, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Health and Human Services, private medicine and academia.

"The conference was designed to draw special attention to the challenge that Wounded Warrior care brings to our self-understanding as a people, a culture, and a nation, and will act to raise national awareness for Wounded Warrior care and its impact on society," said Gabriele.

The conference invited Sailors and Marines, care-givers and military family members to share deeply personal stories about treating Wounded Warriors and their families.

"You must ask and know the story of every wounded warrior and their families," said Rear Adm. Karen Flaherty, U.S. Navy deputy surgeon general and vice chancellor, Navy Medicine Institute, and a panel participant. "When our Sailors and Marines are injured they expect excellence from us. We need imagination, courage and innovation. Mediocrity won't cut it. Our military families are unique. The work we do is not for the shy or for those who embrace the status quo."

The conference is the first of a proposed three-part series in Wounded Warrior care and is part of a broader series of collaborative medical conferences first initiated by the Navy Medicine Institute and the Smithsonian in 2008.

"The growing relationship between the Smithsonian and Navy Medicine is something that I'm delighted to see happen," said Scott Robinson, director, Office of Sponsored Projects Smithsonian Institution. "It bodes well for future collaboration in a variety of areas including research, outreach and public programs."

Robinson said the Smithsonian looks forward to new research now made possible by the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, and the Smithsonian in January 2011.

The next conference presented by Navy Medicine and the Smithsonian will take place June 14, at the National History Museum and is entitled "Real Presence: the Critical Function of Pastoral Care and Academic Theology In Communities of Health." Admission is free and open to all, but space is limited and registration beforehand is recommended.

For more information on the conference, or to register for the June 14 conference, visit http://www.thechiefinformationgroup.com/conference/smithsonian/index.php?c_id=19.

For more news from Navy Medicine, visit www.navy.mil/local/mednews/.

 
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