NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support Supply Corps Officer Talks Nutrition


Story Number: NNS120727-12Release Date: 7/27/2012 2:07:00 PM
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By Sarah Glinski, Naval Supply Systems Command Public Affairs

PHILADELPHIA (NNS) -- Challenging conventional wisdom is part of NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support's (NAVSUP WSS) Lt. Cmdr. Spencer Baker's everyday routine when it comes to nutrition and exercise, and on July 25, he was more than happy to share his knowledge in a presentation to the employees of NSA-Philadelphia.

Baker's presentation - part of a Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Lunch and Learn series with programs in July, August and September - focused on Paleo, Primal and Zone Nutrition for performance, weight loss, longevity and disease prevention.

The idea behind Paleo/Primal/Zone nutrition is simple: don't eat anything a caveman wouldn't eat.

"It just doesn't trigger a satisfaction response to have refined wheat, corn and other processed foods," Baker said during his presentation. "It's important to focus on foods with a high nutrient density like meat, vegetables, nuts and seeds."

Baker also stressed that, when food shopping, it is best to buy food around the perimeter of the store and avoid the aisles packed with "factory foods." The focus should be on animal source protein, and a variety of vegetables, nuts, seeds, fats and natural oils.

In addition, the staple of Paleo/Primal/Zone nutrition is colorful vegetables. They're at the bottom of the Paleo food pyramid because of the essential minerals, vitamins, probiotics and antioxidants they contain. Other foods on the pyramid include fruit, meat, nuts and herbs.

The conspicuously absent foods on the pyramid? Grains and sugars. According to Paleo, Primal and Zone nutrition experts, eating sugars and grains - in any portion size - is a sure-fire way to make yourself hungry, heavy and unhealthy. But, it's okay to treat yourself once in a while.

"You've got around 28 meals a week, including snacks. Eating pizza once a week is reasonable if you are on track with 27 nutrient-rich meals ... You're not exactly living in a monastery, denying yourself life's pleasures by doing that. You're still an 'A' student compared to the rest of the western world," Baker said.

And once you've incorporated better nutrition into your diet, any exercise you do will yield better results.

"As Bruce Lee once said, 'Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, and add what is uniquely your own,'" Baker explained. "That's exactly what this kind of nutrition is about ... With this, you don't have to wait until you're a blackbelt to start eating like a champion."

A field activity of the Naval Supply Systems Command, NAVSUP WSS is the U.S. Navy's supply chain manager providing worldwide support to the aviation, surface ship, and submarine communities. NAVSUP WSS provides Navy, Marine Corps, joint and allied forces with products and services that deliver combat capability through logistics. There are more than 2,000 civilian and military personnel employed at its two Pennsylvania sites. The NAVSUP WSS Philadelphia site supports aircraft, while its Mechanicsburg, Pa., site supports ships and submarines.

For more news from Naval Supply Systems Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/navsup/.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Naval Supply Systems Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/navsup/.

 
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