GALLERY PHOTOS   (111 Images)

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 and NASA personnel retrieve a boilerplate test article during an Underway Recovery Test (URT) with the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Navy Diver Julio Cerecer)
181101-N-ZZ999-303
PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 and NASA personnel retrieve a boilerplate test article during an Underway Recovery Test (URT) with the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Navy Diver Julio Cerecer)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 and NASA personnel retrieve a boilerplate test article during an Underway Recovery Test (URT) with the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Navy Diver Julio Cerecer)
181101-N-ZZ999-301
PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 and NASA personnel retrieve a boilerplate test article during an Underway Recovery Test (URT) with the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Navy Diver Julio Cerecer)
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SAN DIEGO (Nov. 7, 2018) Dr. Donald R. Pettit, a NASA astronaut, addresses local media during a press conference onboard Naval Base San Diego. The amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) recently conducted an Underway Recovery Test (URT) as part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jesse Monford)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) The amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) and a test version of the Orion capsule are in view at sunset during Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the Pacific Ocean, Nov. 1, 2018. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 3, 2018) U.S. Navy divers prepare for night operations during Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26), Nov. 3, 2018. NASA's Recovery Team is testing to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) At sunset, a test version of the Orion capsule floats in the Pacific Ocean during Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7), Nov. 1, 2018. Orion will be towed into the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha's (LPD 26) well deck. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) U.S. Navy divers prepare to attach the "front porch" to a test version of the Orion capsule as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the open water of the Pacific Ocean, Nov. 1, 2018. Orion will be towed into the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha's (LPD 26) well deck. There are two large, orange mockup uprighting bags in this view, but when Orion actually splashes down there will be five. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) U.S. Navy divers attach the collar around a test version of the Orion capsule in the open water of the Pacific Ocean as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7), Nov. 1, 2018. There are two large, orange mockup uprighting bags in this view, but when Orion actually splashes down there will be five. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA)
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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) The test version of the Orion capsule is about to be released into the open water as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26), Nov. 1, 2018. During recovery operations, future astronauts aboard Orion will have the choice to stay in the capsule while it is pulled into the well deck of a U.S. Navy ship or be pulled out immediately and put on the "front porch" until taken by small boat back to the ship. URT-7 is one in a series of tests to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA)
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