GALLERY PHOTOS   (313 Images)

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180807-N-CY182-0485
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (Aug. 7, 2018) Lakeisha Williams, a scientist and principal investigator at Space Warfare Systems Center Atlantic, explains how to use the Office of Naval Research (ONR) TechSolutions-sponsored scuba binary dive application (SBDA 100) to a Navy Diver during a demonstration and evaluation underway period off the coast of Panama City, Fla. The SBDA 100 replaces traditional paper logs and automates the logging and submission of dive profiles directly from a dive computer worn by Navy divers to the Naval Safety Center's Dive Jump Reporting System (DJRS) database. The idea to automate the reporting of dive logs was submitted to ONR's TechSolutions by the Force Master Diver at the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command. (U.S. Navy photo by Bobby Cummings/Released)
180807-N-CY182-0479
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (Aug. 7, 2018) The Office of Naval Research (ONR) TechSolutions-sponsored scuba binary dive application (SBDA 100) replaces traditional paper logs and automates the logging and submission of dive profiles directly from a dive computer worn by Navy Divers to the Naval Safety Center Dive Jump Reporting System (DJRS) database. The idea to automate the reporting of dive logs was submitted to ONR's TechSolutions by the Force Master Diver at the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command. (U.S. Navy photo by Bobby Cummings/Released)
180807-N-CY182-0462
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (Aug. 7, 2018) Scott Lowery, branch head of Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division, demonstrates the Office of Naval Research (ONR) TechSolutions-sponsored scuba binary dive application (SBDA 100) during a demonstration and evaluation off the coast of Panama City, Fla. The SBDA 100 replaces traditional paper logs and automates the logging and submission of dive profiles directly from a dive computer worn by Navy Divers to the Naval Safety's Center Dive Jump Reporting System (DJRS) database. The idea to automate the reporting of dive logs was submitted to ONR's TechSolutions by the Force Master Diver at the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command. (U.S. Navy photo by Bobby Cummings/Released)
180822-N-QP955-001
KISSIMMEE, Fla. (Aug. 22, 2018) Cmdr. Christopher Duplessis and Dr. Biswajit Biswas, researchers at Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC), discuss how bacteriophages - viruses are used to target and consume specific strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria during the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS). (U.S. Navy photo by Steven Van der Werff/Released)
180816-N-DE005-006
DAHLGREN, Va. (Aug. 16, 2018) Dr. Chris Lloyd, high energy laser lethality lead at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), briefs Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Commodore Peter Leavy and his delegation at the NSWCDD Laser Lethality Lab during the RAN delegation's NSWCDD visit. Lloyd explained the importance of rigorous modeling and laboratory testing against target materials to ensure high energy laser systems are built that meet the requirements of the warfighter once fielded. NSWCDD is drawing on its knowledge of electromagnetic launchers, hypervelocity projectiles, and directed energy weapons, in addition to its established core capabilities in complex warfare systems development and integration to incorporate electric weapons technology into existing and future fighting forces and platforms. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
180814-N-LQ867-002
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Aug. 14, 2018) Corrdesa laboratory assistant Vivien Kibble prepares to apply anodize solution to the static port of P-8A Poseidon assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 with a new system being developed collaboratively with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. (U.S. Navy photo by Clifford Davis/Released)
180807-N-DE005-050
DAHLGREN, Va. (Aug. 7, 2018) The Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) Sly Fox Mission 23 team in action while demonstrating ARTEMIS - Autonomous Remote Tactical Engagement Multi-Domain Intelligence Swarm - capabilities. Over the past six months, the team used artificial intelligence and machine learning to develop unmanned vehicle swarms that can counteract potential threats of swarming unmanned systems. The Sly Fox program is an NSWCDD Naval Innovative Science and Engineering (NISE) funded rapid prototyping program intended to develop the science and engineering workforce - mostly junior scientists and engineers - while applying their talents to known technology gaps. NISE is part of National Defense Authorization Act Section 219 legislation, allowing warfare centers and research labs to apply money invested in their organizations to research, engineering and technology. NISE efforts have provided breakthrough research and have been responsible for maturation and transition of technology to the warfighter and programs of record. (U.S. Navy photo by John Joyce/Released)
180807-N-DE005-070
DAHLGREN, Va. (Aug. 7, 2018) The Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) Sly Fox Mission 23 team in action while demonstrating ARTEMIS - Autonomous Remote Tactical Engagement Multi-Domain Intelligence Swarm - capabilities. Over the past six months, the team used artificial intelligence and machine learning to develop unmanned vehicle swarms that can counteract potential threats of swarming unmanned systems. The Sly Fox program is an NSWCDD Naval Innovative Science and Engineering (NISE) funded rapid prototyping program intended to develop the science and engineering workforce - mostly junior scientists and engineers - while applying their talents to known technology gaps. NISE is part of National Defense Authorization Act Section 219 legislation, allowing warfare centers and research labs to apply money invested in their organizations to research, engineering and technology. NISE efforts have provided breakthrough research and have been responsible for maturation and transition of technology to the warfighter and programs of record. (U.S. Navy photo by John Joyce/Released)
180803-N-PO203-0231 PITTSBURGH (Aug. 3, 2018) Rear Adm. David Hahn, Chief of Naval Research, and Dr. David Walker, Research and Development Portfolio Director at the Office of Naval Research (ONR), tour Professor Howie Choset's, right, Biorobotics Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Hahn and Walker were at CMU to attend the Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Autonomy for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) workshop, co-hosted by the ONR and CMU. The workshop brings together a community of academia, industry, and government stakeholders with a diverse pool of first responders in order to accelerate the experimentation, fielding, and scaling of new AI and autonomous capabilities in support of the HADR mission. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)
180803-N-PO203-0040 PITTSBURGH (Aug. 3, 2018) Rear Adm. David Hahn, Chief of Naval Research, joins Dr. Paul Zalocky, left, Chief Scientist, Office of Naval Research (ONR), Lauren Knausenberger, Director, Cyberspace Innovation, United States Air Force, and Dr. Andrew Moore, Dean, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), for a fireside chat during the Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Autonomy for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) workshop, co-hosted by ONR and CMU. The workshop brings together a community of academia, industry, and government stakeholders with a diverse pool of first responders in order to accelerate the experimentation, fielding, and scaling of new AI and autonomous capabilities in support of the HADR mission. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)
180624-N-PO203-0386 SOUTH DAYTONA, Fla. (June 24, 2018) An unmanned autonomous vehicle lifts off from Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) autonomous robotic boat during the finals of the 2018 International RoboBoat Competition at Reed Canal Park in South Daytona, Fla. FAU took fourth place overall during the competition. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the behaviors demonstrated during the competition mimic tasks that are being developed for coastal surveillance, port security and other types of oceanographic operations. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)
180624-N-PO203-0185 
DAYTONA, Fla. (June 24, 2018) An autonomous robotic boat designed by the Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITSN) in Surabaya, Indonesia, navigates a field of obstacles during the finals of the 2018 International RoboBoat Competition at Reed Canal Park in South Daytona, Fla. ITSN completed all tasks successfully and took first place in the competition. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the behaviors demonstrated during the competition mimic tasks that are being developed for coastal surveillance, port security and other types of oceanographic operations. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)
180623-N-PO203-0666 
DAYTONA, Fla. (June 23, 2018) A student designed autonomous robotic boat from Universitas Diponegoro in Semarang, Indonesia, navigates through an aquatic obstacle course during the 2018 International RoboBoat Competition held at Reed Canal Park in South Daytona, Fla. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the behaviors demonstrated during the competition mimic tasks that are being developed for coastal surveillance, port security and other types of oceanographic operations. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)
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