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ATGPAC Hosts Training Conference to Uncover Generational Learning Styles

22 November 2022

From Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet

SAN DIEGO – Afloat Training Group Pacific (ATGPAC) hosted a conference at Naval Base San Diego, November 15-18.

Afloat Training Group Pacific (ATGPAC) hosted a conference at Naval Base San Diego, November 15-18. The theme of the conference was “Training as a Weapon,” which emphasized the need for naval leadership to innovate their training resources to complement generational learning styles. (U.S. Navy photo)
Afloat Training Group Pacific (ATGPAC) hosted a conference at Naval Base San Diego, November 15-18. The theme of the conference was “Training as a Weapon,” which emphasized the need for naval leadership to innovate their training resources to complement generational learning styles. (U.S. Navy photo)
Afloat Training Group Pacific (ATGPAC) hosted a conference at Naval Base San Diego, November 15-18. The theme of the conference was “Training as a Weapon,” which emphasized the need for naval leadership to innovate their training resources to complement generational learning styles. (U.S. Navy photo)
221118-N-ZZ999-1001
Afloat Training Group Pacific (ATGPAC) hosted a conference at Naval Base San Diego, November 15-18. The theme of the conference was “Training as a Weapon,” which emphasized the need for naval leadership to innovate their training resources to complement generational learning styles. (U.S. Navy photo)
Photo By: Courtesy Photo
VIRIN: 221118-N-NO101-1001

The theme of the conference was “Training as a Weapon,” which emphasized the need for naval leadership to innovate their training resources to complement generational learning styles.

“Today’s “digital” age Sailor requires a pedagogical review and analysis of our current methods of training,” said Capt. Christopher Follin, commodore, ATGPAC. “This review and development of relevant training weapons is critical for meeting the CNO’s demand for the “best trained Sailors.” We must develop innovative means to overcome our limited training resources and antiquated methods to address how today's Sailors learn.”

Combined military, government, and industry sessions were held beginning with an academic review of “How today’s adults learn.” Led by Lorentzen and Associates Corporation, these sessions provided action officers with the knowledge and tangible examples necessary to develop applicable requirements that provide high-end, consistent, and repeatable training across all domains afloat and ashore. This was accomplished through development of a deeper understanding of the capabilities, motivations, and effective/tailored methods of learning of a newer generation of Sailors. Visual, aural, kinesthetic, reflective, impulsive, whole-part, and part-whole learners retain knowledge differently depending on their generation. As such, training applications must be tailored to individuals in order to meet their learning needs. This will be more effective than implementing a one-size fits all application of training materials, to include the application of legacy training methods. This will assist in harnessing Sailors’ passion for learning while supporting increased retention of material.

“Future training techniques must incorporate a thorough understanding of generational learning styles” said Barry Walsh, a facilitator assigned to ATG. “Baby boomers, millennials, X, Y, and Z generations learn and retain information differently. The merging of an understanding of generational learning styles and tailored training delivery methods based on the needs of those styles, utilizing existing and newer technology is essential in the development of timely and relevant training of information that can be more thoroughly retained by the Sailor.”

Surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, air warfare, engineering and damage control working groups provided insight into existing legacy training methods. Working groups were moderated with objectives and requirements for training delivery methods based on preferred generational learning styles of expected trainees. The stated requirements were captured and presented to ATGPAC for further analysis and technological capture. This is the first step in implementing a newer, aggressive strategy to develop generational and technically savvy techniques to provide continuous and relevant individual, team, ship, and strike group training methods to the Fleet.

 

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