A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the overall fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy budget.

Department of the Navy FY 2022 President's Budget

28 May 2021

28 May 2021

The Department of the Navy’s (DoN) Fiscal Year 2022 (FY22) President’s Budget submission (PB22) of $211.7B is an increase of $3.8B (1.8%) from the FY21 enacted budget. This budget supports and aligns with the President’s Interim National Security Strategy and the Tri-Service Maritime Strategy and reflects a collaborative effort to maintain our advantage at sea. The Department used an analytically driven approach, supported by a strong history of reform to drive the maximum value of each dollar. At the end of the day, it’s a return on investment for the security and prosperity of the American people.

A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the overall fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy budget.
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the overall fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the overall fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy budget.
210528-N-NO101-0001
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the overall fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
Photo By: Luke Lamborn
VIRIN: 210528-N-NO101-0001

Ultimately, the strength of our Navy is measured by our ability to control the seas and to project power. Our Navy needs to operate forward to do that. The budget provides for a deployable battle force of 296 ships in FY22. This supports 11 aircraft carriers and 31 amphibious ships that serve as the foundation for our carrier and amphibious ready groups. 

This budget represents the best mix of investments to defend the nation by innovating and modernizing the force, taking care of our people, and succeeding through teamwork. It continues the Navy’s recapitalization of the Columbia-class strategic ballistic missile submarine, our number one acquisition priority and a significant investment needed to maintain our strategic nuclear deterrent into the future. The Department continues to innovate with capabilities and concepts of operations as we continue towards distributed maritime operations enhanced by investments in platforms, hypersonic weapons, and unmanned capabilities. To enhance our readiness, this budget makes targeted investments in training, ship maintenance, flying hours, and infrastructure. The Department remains committed to our most valuable asset – our people – with increased focus on eradicating sexual harassment and emphasis on the mental and physical readiness of our fighting force and their families. And we succeed through teamwork by sustaining naval exercises with allies and partners.

A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy operation and maintenance budget.
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy operation and maintenance budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy operation and maintenance budget.
210528-N-NO101-0003
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy operation and maintenance budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
Photo By: Luke Lamborn
VIRIN: 210528-N-NO101-0003


In FY22, 17 battle force ships will be delivered:  3 destroyers, 1 Zumwalt destroyer, 3 nuclear attack submarines (SSN), 5 littoral combat ships (LCS), 1 amphibious transport dock (LPD), 1 fleet replenishment oiler (T-AO), 1 expeditionary fast transport (T-EPF), 1 expeditionary staging base (T-ESB), and 1 first-in-class towing, salvage, and rescue ship (T-ATS). Additionally, 14 battle force ships will be retired:  4 littoral combat ships (LCS), 2 nuclear attack submarines (SSN), 7 cruisers (CG), 1 amphibious transport dock (LSD), and 1 fleet ocean tug (T-ATF). Under fiscal constraints, the Navy will decommission legacy capabilities and ships to enable increased investment in assets that will give us a stronger, agile, and more lethal force.

Ship procurement funds 8 new-construction battle force ships in FY22 (2 SSN, 1 DDG, 1 FFG, 1 T-AO, 2 T-ATS, 1 T-AGOS(X)), as well as four landing craft utility 1700 and two additional ship-to-shore connectors. This request also includes continued incremental funding of the first Columbia-class submarine and CVN-80 and CVN-81 Ford-class aircraft carriers.

A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy procurement budget.
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy procurement budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy procurement budget.
210528-N-NO101-0005
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy procurement budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
Photo By: Luke Lamborn
VIRIN: 210528-N-NO101-0005

The Department is completing aircraft procurement of several type-model series, including the P-8A Poseidon and the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Aircraft procurement funds 107 airframes (fixed-wing, rotary-wing, unmanned) in FY22 (17 F-35B, 20 F-35C, 5 E-2D, 6 KC-130J, 9 CH-53K, 3 CMV-22, 5 MV-22B, 36 TH-73A, and 6 MALE-T UAS) and funds operations, maintenance, and training for nine Navy carrier air wings and three Marine Corps wings.

The DoN’s Research and Development (R&D) request continues investment toward innovation to deliver more future capabilities in the near and long-term. R&D funding increases by 13% for the Navy and 9% for the Marine Corps over the FY21 enacted amounts with our Advanced Component Development and Prototypes (ACD&P) and System Development and Demonstration (SD&D) making up the bulk of the funds. R&D is vital to provide for future technologies that support innovative capabilities in shipbuilding (Columbia-class), aviation (F-35), weapons (Maritime Strike Tomahawk), and experimental technology (Conventional Prompt Strike), unmanned, and cyber technology. These technologies are crucial to maintaining DoN’s competitive advantage.

A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy research and development budget.
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy research and development budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy research and development budget.
210528-N-NO101-0006
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy research and development budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
Photo By: Luke Lamborn
VIRIN: 210528-N-NO101-0006

The Military Construction request of $2.4 billion funds 29 projects (of which, 13 are for the active Navy, 1 for Navy Reserve, 14 for the active Marine Corps, and 1 for Marine Corps Reserve), Unspecified Minor Construction, and Planning and Design. This request also includes $549.5 million for the Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Program (SIOP), an increase of over 115% compared to FY21. SIOP is designed to update the physical layout of the four naval shipyards, upgrade and modernize their dry docks, and replace antiquated capital equipment with modern machines. Total FY22 SIOP investment is $830M.

A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy infrastructure budget.
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy infrastructure budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy infrastructure budget.
210528-N-NO101-0002
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy infrastructure budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
Photo By: Luke Lamborn
VIRIN: 210528-N-NO101-0002


This budget funds key readiness programs to affordable level through sustained investment and performance improvement: ship depot maintenance; ship operations (58 days/quarter deployed and 24 days/quarter non-deployed); air depot maintenance; flying hours; Marine Corps expeditionary equipment; and facilities sustainment to 80% of the sustainment model (both Navy and Marine Corps).

The budget request supports an active duty end force of 346,200 Navy and 178,500 Marine Corps personnel and a Selected Reserve Force of 58,600 Navy and 36,800 Marine Corps personnel. Most importantly, the DoN request further invests in key programs dedicated to taking care of service members and their families to include mental health programs, sexual assault prevention and response, privatized housing improvement projects, education, and increased child care options. Service members, Department of Defense civilians, and all those who support our mission, are entitled to an environment free of discrimination, hate, and harassment.

A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy personnel budget.
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy personnel budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy personnel budget.
210528-N-NO101-0004
WASHINGTON (May 28, 2021) A U.S. Navy graphic illustrating the fiscal year 2022 Department of the Navy personnel budget. (U.S. Navy Graphic)
Photo By: Luke Lamborn
VIRIN: 210528-N-NO101-0004

With this budget, we are making prudent choices and smart investments in the future of the Navy and Marine Corps, which will enable us to operate forward with the capabilities and confidence necessary for the challenges of the 21st century.

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